“a consumer reports for the cheap” — the new york times

When deciding whether to use a digital or analog baby monitor, consider your location and the monitor's proximity to other electronic devices in your home. A digital baby monitor will protect your privacy if you have close neighbors with infants and minimize interference with other devices. Try to find out which frequencies your favorite devices use and select a cheap baby monitor that operates on a different frequency. A baby monitor that lets you know when you're out of range or about to run out of battery power will keep you from going crazy wondering whether it has stopped functioning whenever you hear silence. Many baby monitors can blaze through batteries in a single night or even a few hours, so choose one with rechargeable batteries and AC adapters to save money. Keep in mind that distance ranges on low-cost baby monitors are notoriously inaccurate, and make sure you understand the store's return policy so you can take back any budget baby monitor that doesn't work in your home.

Technology Frequency Power Options Range Indicators
Sony BabyCall NTM-910 estimated price $40
Analog 900 MHz AC adapter, rechargeable batteries 120 feet Out-of-range, low-battery, and sound indicator lights
Fisher-Price Remote Control Musical Audio Monitor estimated price $50
Digital 2.4 GHz AC adapter, rechargeable batteries 800 feet Out-of-range, low-battery, and sound indicator lights
Graco iMonitor Vibe estimated price $45
Digital 900 MHz 2 AC adapters, rechargeable batteries, battery backup for child unit 2,000 feet Sound-activated vibration; out-of-range, low-battery, and sound indicator lights
Summer Infant Secure Sounds Digital Monitor estimated price $65
Digital 2.4 GHz 2 AC adapters, recharging base, battery backup for child unit 650 feet Out-of-range, low-battery, and sound indicator lights
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