Gentron GG3500 Review

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Gentron's GG3500 is cheap and quiet, as well as easy to start and use, thanks to its electric starter. However, users say the instructions could be better.

The Gentron GG3500 (starting at $415, Amazon) portable generator is typical for this price range. Buyers from Sam's Club who posted Gentron GG3500 reviews say they like this model because it's relatively cheap for a generator in the 3,000-watt range and is easy to start thanks to the electric starter. After enjoying the benefits of an 18-hour run on one tank of gas when connected to an air conditioner, a TV, and a couple of fans, one reviewer says he was duly impressed with this budget generator. Reviews also report that this model is fairly quiet. A few users note, however, that installing the wheel kit is tricky and a couple of reviews at both Sam's Club and Sears grumble about units that arrived at the doorstep in damaged condition.

A couple key features found on the GG3500 will appeal to most users, especially the electric start and the wheel kit. The generator also includes a back-up recoil start should the electric start fail. The Gentron features two 110v outlets and one 220v twist lock outlet and runs on unleaded gas; the four-gallon tank should last for about 11 hours at half load. This 3,000/3,500-watt model (3,000 running watts and 3,500 starting watts) is not quite as powerful as some of the other models we looked at, but acquits itself nicely nonetheless. It's rated at 67 decibels, not too loud at all for a gas engine.

The Gentron GG3500 is a good choice for homeowners and campers whose power needs max out at about 3,000 watts. It's certainly powerful enough to run critical appliances such as a fridge and a freezer or boiler, as well as a TV and some lights. The electric start is an appealing addition, as is the wheel kit. Given that a few users report receiving units in sorry shape with an online purchase, you might try to arrange for in-store pick up or buy one at a brick-and-mortar outlet.

Michael Sweet

Michael Sweet writes about consumer electronics. If something runs on electricity or ones and zeroes, he's interested in it. Sweet has written about PC technology and consumer electronics for 14 years.

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