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In this review:
  1. Best Cheap Leaf Blowers
  2. Electric Leaf Blowers vs. Gas Leaf Blowers
  3. Electric Leaf Blower Reviews
  4. Gas Leaf Blower Reviews
  5. Leaf Blower Deals
  6. Discount Leaf Blowers Features Comparison Table

Cheap Leaf Blowers Buying Guide

When autumn leaves or the remains of a storm are strewn about the yard, a cheap leaf blower can save you hours of time and loads of back-breaking effort. Although you can spend $500 or so for a professional-grade backpack blower, that kind of power isn't really necessary unless your property spreads over acres and your trees are so numerous that carrying around a handheld blower would be exhausting.

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Most people can render their driveways, decks, yards, and even gutters leafless with a corded electric model for under $100 or a gas model for less than $150. Some handheld leaf blowers even vacuum and mulch and come with a bag for leaves and other debris.

Toro, Black & Decker, Craftsman, and Weed Eater dominate the market for cheap and higher-end leaf blowers, but there are other worthy players, as well. We researched cheap corded electric and gas leaf blowers and identified several in each category that stand up to scrutiny. For electric leaf blowers we like the Toro 51609 Ultra (starting at $70), which is top-rated by reviewers for impressive power and ultra-adjustable speed control, and the Black & Decker LH4500 LeafHog (starting at $67), which scores for ease of use and punchy performance. Among gas leaf blowers, our picks include the Hitachi RB24EAP (starting at $129) for its quick start and relatively light weight, and the Weed Eater FB25 (starting at $77) for durability and ease of assembly. Two cheap leaf blowers that disappoint are the electric Black & Decker BV2500 (starting at $48), which looks great on paper (plenty of power and features) but is undone by user gripes about durability, and the Ryobi RY09055 (starting at $99), which boasts a wallet-friendly price and a robust stream of air but reviewers assert it's hard to get going and often won't start at all.

There are two types of leaf blowers: gas-powered and electric (corded and battery, although we discuss only corded models). The choice of one over the other depends largely on your yard-maintenance needs and the size of your property. If you'll be clearing an area whose borders are within reach of a power source (usually about 100 feet), cheap electric leaf blowers offer definite advantages. In addition to being less costly than gas models, electric blowers tend to be lighter and quieter. They start without the hassle of pulling on a cord and don't give off gas fumes. Some budget electric leaf blowers also vacuum and mulch leaves and other organic debris (occasional small pebbles, too). On the downside, you must learn to manage the power cord, which can be challenging if there are lots of obstructions in place.

If you need to clear layers of leaves, pinecones, and thick twigs off a broad swath of territory, a cheap gas leaf blower is the way to go. Gas-powered models generally carry heftier price tags than electric but they pack more of a punch and you can clear a larger area because there's no cord to confine your range. That said, gas leaf blowers are messier (you must mix gasoline and oil in the proper proportions and keep up with the maintenance); starting the machine requires effort (and it may be temperamental); controlling the speed takes some practice; the cost of fuel and oil is ongoing; and you must be extra cautious about keeping flammable material around.

After you've settled on either a cheap electric or gas leaf blower, the model's specifications are the next order of business. First is the speed at which the air exits the machine, measured in miles per hour (mph), and the volume of air pushed through, measured in cubic feet per minute (CFM). The higher the numbers, the better. Many of the best cheap leaf blowers feature multiple speeds so you can change up the air flow to suit the job. Next, pay attention to the weight and choose a machine that will be comfortable to carry. Some budget leaf blowers are three-in-one combos that vacuum and mulch in addition to blow leaves and debris, and these mostly come with additional components (for blowing or suctioning), collection bags, and sometimes extension tubes. In short, the key to buying a leaf blower on a budget is to match the capabilities of the machine to the task at hand.

Before buying a leaf blower of any type make sure local municipal ordinances permit them. Several communities -- particularly in California, which has very strict emissions standards -- ban gas-powered leaf blowers. Others restrict or prohibit leaf blowers because of noise. Most communities with such ordinances limit noise output to 70 decibels. Manufacturers have redesigned their products to make them quieter, but not all meet this standard, although several that we researched do.

Review continues below

A final note of caution: Cheap leaf blowers, and gas blowers in particular, are noisy enough to cause hearing loss, so wear ear protection. It's also a good idea to wear goggles and a dust mask as defenses against dust and pollutants, such as bird droppings and chemicals, that get blown around along with the leaves. And always remember to keep other people and pets away in case debris flies in their direction.

by Gina Briles (Google+ Profile)

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Best Cheap Leaf Blowers

Toro 51609 Ultra
Gold Medal

Toro 51609 Ultra

This electric blower/vac wins acclaim from reviewers for its power. It's relatively quiet and, at just 7.5 pounds, easy to carry. It also mulches the waste it vacuums, and reviewers appreciate the metal impeller, which resists damage from pebbles, twigs, pinecones, and other debris.

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Hitachi RB24EAP
Gold Medal

Hitachi RB24EAP

The gas-powered Hitachi RB24EAP rises to the top of the list for its easy start, manageable weight, and effectiveness -- even on prickly debris like seedpods. Some users caution about the air intake, which can pull on clothes, and some report rotted fuel lines after a few months of use, but this seems to be a problem common to the genre.

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Good Cheap Leaf Blowers

Black & Decker LH4500 LeafHog
Gold Medal

Black & Decker LH4500 LeafHog

The electric LeafHog works as advertised, scoring for its solid performance in blowing and then mulching dry leaves. Users are impressed with its power and variable speed options, and say it holds up well against the occasional stone or wood chip that gets sucked up. The catch-bag catches some flak for size and quality, but users consider this model a good buy.

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Weed Eater FB25
Gold Medal

Weed Eater FB25

Remarkably light, at 8.1 pounds, this is an easy-to-carry gas blower that isn't uber-powerful but can still take care of most chores around a deck, driveway, or small yard. It just might not do the trick on huge piles of leaves. Users say it starts within three pulls for the most part, and they like that the handle minimizes vibration. While this machine is not noisy for a gas blower, it's still pretty loud.

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Don't Bother

Black & Decker BV2500

Many users seem to like the Black & Decker BV2500, but it mulches at a lower ratio than other, more powerful mulching blowers and has a plastic impeller, which can be easily damaged. The real Achilles' heel of this model, though, is its lack of durability.

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Ryobi RY09055

Sold exclusively through Home Depot, this gas-powered blower disappoints users despite an appealing price point. Reviewers assert it's difficult to start and is known to be finicky about fuel, being easily damaged when filled with low-quality gasoline containing ethanol. Some users say it works well but a high proportion of negative reviews suggest it's a risky purchase.

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